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Oedipus

a new version
by Blake Morrison

In order to rid his land of a deverstating plague, Oedipus has to find the murderer of previous ruler, Laius. Determined to suceed, his well meaning search for the truth leads to his tragically spectaclar fall.

A political icon, revered by his people and loved by his family, he is victim of cruellest whims of gods who condemn him to sordid destiny involving patricde and incest.

Both innocent and guilty, the circumstances of his downfall power one of world’s greatest and most famous tragedies.

Blake Morrison’s exciting new version of Oedipus breathes new life into this classic drama. Northern Broadsides bring their distinctive energy and uncompromisingperformance style to this powerful story that still stirs the soul, centuries after it was written.

“This is acting so immediate, so alarmingly intimate….
it becomes difficult to believe that anyone could be only
pretending.”

The Guardian (Alfred Hickling)

“The confrontations are like hammer blows, catastrophe is
inevitable but the narrative is kept taut with tension…This
is classic drama for everyone”

The Stage (Kevin Berry)

“Blake Morrison has written a wonderful version of Oedipus….
its language is both plain and rare”

Observer (Susannah Clapp)

“Refreshingly bold – I’ve seen many revivals of Greek plays that
tried to shed the classical hauteur…but never one that so
bluntly deglamorised an ancient tragedy and relocated it to
our era. And somehow it works.”

The Times (Benedict Nightingale)

“Morrison’s swift and unemphatically poetic version of
Sophocles is a perfect example of levity in seriousness,
exuberance in tragedy. The tale unfolds with a literally
blinding clarity. Broadsides are touring- Catch them if you can.”

Daily Mail (Michael Coveney)

“This flexible, creative treatment of a classic of the Western
repertoire takes several risks but fully justifies them, because
nothing is allowed to obscure the great strength of the
original play it’s inexorable rhythm, its intellectual clout and its aural beauty.”

Times Literary Supplement (Edith Hall)

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